Reservoir Inn (formerly The Jolly Fisherman), Thornton, April 2018

Another springtime stroll. I’ve said this before enough times, but when we plan walks on Sundays, it’s very hard to find ones with pubs on that don’t just serve up full plates of roast dinner. If you run a pub, there’s a very easy way to rectify this. Do what the Reservoir Inn do. Offer baguettes with roast meat in, a small bowl of roast veg (lovely crisp parsnips and potatoes in this case), and if you’re really doing it properly, a little jug of gravy. Like this:-

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This was a fantastic lunch, the veg were lovely, the gravy was thick and meaty, the beef was nice and the horseradish was delightfully piquant. The baguette was slighty under baked (this phrase is always spoken in Paul Hollywood’s voice now) and probably didn’t need any butter, but apart from this, the perfect Sunday lunch time meal.

The Reservoir Inn is a cracking little village pub. It’s slightly confusing, as everywhere you look there seems to be some Steamin’ Billy Brewing Co branding (a local pub chain who don’t actually brew despite their name). Indeed, my beer choice today was Sky Diver by Steamin’ Billy (great lacing, a touch of malt, but not much more).

However, it’s not a Steamin’ Billy pub, just a great pub that we will come back to again. Walkers are welcome with muddy(ish) boots and/or wet dogs in the bar area on the left hand side. Recommended.

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Coach House Cafe, Rufford Abbey Country Park, Nottinghamshire, April 2018

We want plates. Today was the perfect example of why. On to the that in a moment.

We were in the area doing a few bits and pieces and decided to stop here for lunch and then maybe a bit of a wander around the grounds. It’s certainly worth staying a while to get value for money from the car park fee 🙂

So, on to plates. As you can see, the food below is served on a silly slate, not a plate. If you look closely, you might spot three halves of panino. Two of those halves are from the second attempt at making one. The other half is from the first attempt, and its counterpart never made it onto the slate, slipping down on to the floor with great speed. A plate would likely have stopped this, saving the cafe time and money, and the person who dropped it embarassment. The hungry customer (me) did rather well, as I got 50% extra free.

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The moral of this story is very definitely to use plates to serve up your tasty ham and cheese panino (it was very tasty indeed), because then you don’t waste money. The large thimble of coleslaw wasn’t much to write home about, but the rest was very nice.

A good place for a spot of lunch, just a shame that the weather didn’t hold out so that we could explore more of the grounds…

The Ale Cellar Tea Room, Lyme Park, April 2018

More National Trust action. NT membership means that you don’t have to pay their extortionate parking charges, and each visit to an NT car park “pays off” the membership fee each year. Nowadays it doesn’t take all that many visits for membership to be worthwhile.

Today we were back at Lyme Park for another walk, finishing off one we started over 2 days in 2014. The weather forecast was essentially overcast, an improvement on yesterday’s rain and mudfest, but still not the spring that we are waiting for.

The last time that we came to the Ale Cellar, they had run out of ale. No such problems today, but there was not a great deal of variety on the menu, and the portions were vaguely adequate at best. You’d expect some big doorstop sandwich rather than just some posh sliced white with a few crisps and token salad tossed in.

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It’s fair to say we were underwhelmed today, not really adequate sustenance for a dank and dreary April stroll. In summary, meh.

Plank & Leggit, March 2018 #2

The sun is out, the sky is blue, and we are hopping across borders. We started our walk in Shardlow, Derbyshire, crossing briefly back into Leicestershire and then after lunch we will go over to Nottinghamshire. All of this within a few miles, because we are in that odd “three counties corner” that is found just up the road from us.

The route of our walk found us not far from the Planl & Leggit for the second time this month. This time it was our choice, but largely because it’s hard to find a pub that serves a normal menu on a Sunday lunchtime, so this will do for today.

Not just some sad looking sandwiches either, a chicken and bacon baguette with melted cheese, leaves, and some finely chopped red onion (for some reason).

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There was also a side of decent pub chips, although they were in a weird plastic basket with that weird waxy gingham paper that seems to be finding its way into more and more pubs.

No beer once again, because Greene King IPA doesn’t count, so lime and soda saves the day, and we were soon on our way and crossing the border to finish our walk.

Benugo, St Pancras International, London, March 2018

It’s another in the “quick post” series. After a late breakfast this morning (more like brunch) we weren’t starving at lunchtime, so delayed our lunch plans until we got back to the station. After the freezing cold weather, we wanted something warm, so headed to Benugo for some toasted sandwiches.

The “New Yorker” is apparently the most popular sandwich, consisting of shaved turkey breast, crispy bacon, Gruyère, sliced tomato, iceberg lettuce and Dijon mayo on dark caraway ciabatta.

It certainly makes for a tasty sandwich, although the iceberg lettuce didn’t really need to be in there, as it didn’t add anything worthwhile to the sandwich.

There are various dining options at St Pancras, Benugo is not a bad choice.

The Marquis Cornwallis, Bloomsbury, March 2018

A lunch stop in London. The Marquis, affectionately known (by Mrs MOFAD and I at least) as the Marsellus Wallace (Ving Rhames’ character from Pulp Fiction) is a pub that has featured here before. Having stayed at the hotel opposite a number of times, it’s somewhere I’ve been to quite a bit.

As I was in the area, I popped in for lunch, and there was time for a drink and a sandwich. The drink was another Thornbridge beer, thanks to their craft beer residency also being here. This was Ena, a nitro milk stout that was smooth, sweet and creamy. Little coffee hint and plenty of roastiness.

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Lunch was a posh fish finger sandwich (I love a posh fish finger) and chips, and was perfectly pleasant.

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It’s good to see that the Marquis is still on good form after a recent refit. More than can be said for our more local Marquis Wellington, which we are still boycotting.

Grounds Cafe, Hicks Lodge, February 2018

Another day out walking. Conditions underfoot today have been squelchy and squashy, much like they have for most of the winter. Luckily we knew that a warm welcome awaited in this cafe, as it’s somewhere that occasional MOFAD companion and triple pork nirvana chaser Dan has been a lot.

We arrived after 2pm for a late lunch, which was probably not a bad idea as a few tables had become free (it’s very popular as there are loads of cycle trails around this former coal mining site).

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A nice simple lunch today, chicken, bacon and cheese panino (although it was a baguette pretending to be a panino), with a little bit of salad on the side. Once again I left the sad iceberg lettuce to its own devices and ate the rest, including some very nice cherry tomatoes.

This little cafe is great if you are walking or cycling in the area. They are open until 4pm on winter weekdays, 5pm at weekends and also 5pm all week between February and October half terms. They open until 9pm every Thursday all year round.